New York Observer

The 100 Most Powerful People in New York Real Estate

September 1, 2008

Bloomberg, Trump, Ratner, De Niro, the Guy Behind Craigslist! They’re All Among Our 100 Most Powerful People in New York Real Estate

Power. Webster’s Dictionary defines power as… No, no, no, never mind that: Power in New York City real estate means money—its acquisition, spending and creation—especially now, as the market enters a tremulous sunset after several bright, shiny years. Our list of the 100 Most Powerful People in New York Real Estate was assembled with this finance centric criterion at the forefront. The list, especially higher up, contains those who animate the deals and the trends. They are the deciders and the money providers.

They make the real estate world the rest of us live in; or cover, as the case may be. This criterion explains why some people were obvious picks (financiers like No. 20 Josef Ackermann and No. 7 Lloyd Blankfein; developers like No. 1 Jerry Speyer and No. 9 Douglas Durst; landlords like No. 33 Bill Rudin and No. 66 Lloyd Goldman); and why some picks weren’t so obvious initially (No. 58 Charles Stevenson, the co-op board president at 740 Park; No. 26 Robert De Niro, perhaps the greatest living actor who became Tribeca’s greatest booster; No. 15 Edward Egan, the Catholic archbishop of New York with all that church property under his purview).

The criterion also helps explain why we didn’t rank any brokers until No. 25 Dolly Lenz, probably the most successful residential broker in the U.S. Why? However capable and ingenious in the commissioned service of those spending the capital, brokers are facilitators for the likes of Messrs. Durst and Speyer (or of Messrs. De Niro and Egan, for that matter). They are not the initiators. The same holds for public o!cials, including the mighty Michael Bloomberg (No. 2). They seem to be at their best for real estate either facilitating its development or standing clear of its ascendancy. That is, obstructionist or helper; and Mr. Bloomberg’s administration has done very little of the former and a lot of the latter.

Finally, a few observations about the top 100. It, like the upper echelons of New York real estate, was whiter than East Hampton’s, well, white pages: David Jackson (No. 50), the CEO of Istithmar, and Governor David Paterson (No. 13) were the only African-Americans on the list. And Ms. Lenz, the broker, was the highest-ranking woman in private industry. She was joined by just eight other women.

Also, the list, as you might expect for one based on money and its management, was heavy on extreme wealth, even by New York standards, including both inherited (Kent Swig, Rob Speyer, Billy Macklowe, Donald Trump and Bill Rudin) and self-created (Mort Zuckerman, Joseph Moinian, Leonard Litwin and Larry Silverstein). There were, however, a fair amount of almostfrom-nothing entrepreneurs splashed across the list: Lockhart Steele, No. 91, publisher of the Curbed Network of blogs; Michael Shvo, No. 100, Manhattan luxury marketing in the meticulously tanned flesh; Craig Newmark, No. 6, that guy in glasses from San Francisco who has all the brokers frightened for their livelihoods; Keith McNally, No. 90, the hotel bellhop who became a restaurant deity; and on … Who knows who’ll make it next year?

 

1JERRY SPEYER

Chairman and CEO of

Tishman Speyer

Mr. Speyer may lack Donald

Trump’s bluster, but the titan sealed

the most expensive residential purchase

in history ($5.4 billion for

Stuyvesant Town and Cooper Village);

owns the MetLife and Chrysler

buildings and Rockefeller Center;

and very nearly won the right to

develop the West Side rail yards.

2MICHAEL BLOOMBERG

Mayor of New York City

More than any

other lawmaker,

Mr. Bloomberg

sets the tone for

development in

New York City.

In his six-plus

years as mayor,

he has boosted

below-marketrate

housing, opened up swaths of

the waterfront to new construction,

laid groundwork for development

on the far West Side and

pushed a series of mega-projects.

3 STEPHEN ROSS

Chairman and CEO of the

Related Companies

Mr. Ross may

have lost the

competition for

the West Side

rail yards, but

the steadfast

friend of Dan

Doctoro” is still

riding high, injecting

$500 million

into the Bronx Terminal Market,

chairing REBNY and working

with Vornado’s Steve Roth to resuscitate

the Moynihan Station plan.

4MARC HOLLIDAY

CEO of SL Green

Mr. Holliday heads New York City’s

largest commercial landlord, SL

Green. The firm,

with 67 properties

scattered

across New York

and Connecticut,

has recently

made forays beyond

its breadand-

butter portfolio

of Class B

buildings. Along with a minority

Canadian partner, SL Green made

the last giant building purchase

of 2007, the $1.6 billion purchase

of Citigroup’s 388-390 Greenwich

Street downtown.

5AMANDA BURDEN

Chair, City Planning

Commission; Director,

Department of City Planning

Any major landuse

change in the

city must pass

over Ms. Burden’s

desk—if it

didn’t originate

there in the first

place. She has

presided over 82

rezonings covering

more than 6,100 blocks, and to

date, she is the shining star of the

Bloomberg administration’s stillincomplete

development legacy.

6CRAIG NEWMARK

Founder and Owner of

Craigslist

The bald, bespectacled

bus-taker

doesn’t have

the suaveness of

shiny-shoed Manhattan

real estate

brokers, but he’ll

conquer them

all anyway. His

site’s New York

City housing listings—313,165 in April

2007 and then 567,883 in April 2008—

often cuts out broker middlemen,

which cuts out their chronic hype.

7LLOYD BLANKFEIN

Chairman and CEO of

Goldman Sachs

Behind all the

shrill chintz

of real estate,

there’s just the

money, and a lot

of it comes from

a company led

by a 53-year-old

raised in Brooklyn

public housing.

But Mr. Blankfein’s Goldman

Sachs symbolizes something beyond

epic funds: These lenders aren’t just

kings, they’re the kingmakers.

8BRUCE RATNER

Chairman of Forest City

Ratner Companies

The leader of what

is perhaps New

York’s most highprofile

development,

the controversy

magnet

Atlantic Yards,

Bruce Ratner is

one of the most active

developers in

the city, often pursuing large, publicly

administered projects. He’s recently

taken a liking to famous architects, ensuring

that his developments leave a

notable impression on the skyline.

9DOUGLAS DURST

Co-president of the Durst

Organization

His Bank of

America Tower

is the most successful

new office

building in

town, and it happens

to be the

most sustainable,

too. Better

yet, Mr. Durst

has said green costs will be made

back quickly.

10 LEE BOLLINGER

President of Columbia

University

In a town where

real estate is

rarely measured

in acres,

Lee Bollinger is

leading Columbia

toward a

17-acre expansion,

adding 6.8

million square

feet to the campus. With the help

of eminent domain, or at least the

threat, he will be responsible for

the wholesale transformation of

West Harlem.

11 MICHAEL ALFANO

Executive Vice President,

New York University

This onetime dean of N.Y.U.’s College

of Dentistry now oversees the

15 million square feet leased and

owned by the university, and is

spearheading a plan to add six million

feet of new space in the next 25

years. That’s no easy task, particularly

in the notoriously prickly Village

community.

12 JAMES DIMON

Chairman and CEO of

JPMorgan Chase

Savior of Bear Stearns (and perhaps

the American financial system?),

Mr. Dimon’s

firm has

deep tentacles

in the real estate

industry

in New York,

whether as a

lender or as a

landlord: Many

are waiting to

see what becomes of Bear Stearns’

old headquarters at 383 Madison,

a building valued at well

over $1 billion.

13 DAVID PATERSON

Governor of

New York State

If a New York

City development

project

costs more than

$1 billion, chances

are it falls under

the governor’s

scope. To

name a few that

the state controls

or administers: Moynihan

Station, the World Trade Center,

the Second Avenue Subway, Atlantic

Yards, Brooklyn Bridge Park.

14 MORT ZUCKERMAN

Chairman of Boston

Properties

The Daily News

publisher’s real

estate firm owns

over 5.5 million

square feet of

New York o!ce

space. It’s also

developing one

of the few new

o!ce skyscrapers:

the planned 39-story tower at

250 West 55th Street.

15 EDWARD EGAN

Cardinal and Catholic

Archbishop of New York

God has imbued

Mr. Egan with

more than just

the power of

the divine. Mr.

Egan is estimated

to control

billions worth

of New York

real estate, including

the priceless St. Patrick’s

Cathedral, hundreds of parishes

(96 in Manhattan alone), schools

(including universities) and even

hospitals.

16 CHRISTINE QUINN

Speaker of the

New York City Council

For almost any new major development

and zoning change in

the city, the final

stop is the

City Council.

The fate of billions

of dollars’

worth of development

will be

determined by

Ms. Quinn and

the Council in

just the coming months.

17 ARTHUR

ZECKENDORF

Owner and Co-chairman

of Zeckendorf Realty

He decided to do

a study on limestone,

and now

about 85,000

chunks of Indiana

limestone, of

the sort used to

build the Empire

State Building,

make up 15 Central

Park West. And thanks to that

condo, developed by Mr. Zeckendorf

and older brother William Lie, stony

primness is in, sparkly glitz is out.

18 MIKI NAFTALI

CEO and President of

Elad Properties

He fell in love with a ramshackle,

money-losing Plaza Hotel, then

Elad paid about $838,509 per room

to buy it up. The redone Plaza, now

more condo than hotel, has dozens

of bubbly buyers who paid 10 times

that amount for their suites—right

before the market flattened.

19 SHELDON SOLOW

Developer

After hammering

out a compromise

with Councilman

Daniel Garodnick,

this billionaire

won city approval

to build seven

cloud-busters just

south of the United Nations. The $4

billion project also includes a public

school, five acres of open space, a $10

million pedestrian bridge over F.D.R.

Drive and ground-floor retail.

20 JOSEF

ACKERMANN

CEO and Management

Board Chairman of Deutsche Bank

Perhaps nothing

encapsulates New

York real estate’s

animating power

better than the

relationship of

Deutsche to Harry

Macklowe. Mr.

Macklowe took a

$5.8 billion loan to help pay for his $7

billion purchase of seven Manhattan

skyscrapers in February 2007. A year

later, Mr. Macklowe couldn’t a”ord

to pay back Deutsche. So the German

bank took control of the buildings in a

tentative deal.

21 DANIEL BOYLE

Chairman of the New York

State Liquor Authority

The future of this “city that never

sleeps” rests with the former Syracuse

cop, who has lent a more sympathetic

ear to long-ignored local

community boards, frustrating restaurateurs

and bar operators citywide.

There are plenty of hassles besides

getting a liquor license—but

just try paying rent without one.

22 SHELDON SILVER

Speaker of the New

York State Assembly

As one of the

“three men in a

room” in Albany,

Sheldon Silver

wields tremendous

power over

every piece of

legislation and

any budget that

comes through

the state house, and has quashed

or delayed numerous development

projects, including the West Side

stadium and congestion pricing.

23 STEVEN ROTH

Chairman and C.E.O. of

Vornado Realty Trust

The notoriously

aggressive Steven

Roth is on a quest

to expand midtown’s

thriving office

district to the

area around Penn

Station, where he

has all but bet the

farm, owning 7.5 million square feet.

All is connected with the chronically

delayed redevelopment and expansion

of Penn Station.

24 DANNY MEYER

President of Union

Square Hospitality Group

The restaurateur

from St.

Louis triggered

the transformation

of an entire

neighborhood

with the opening

of his Union

Square Café

in 1985; the once-seedy area now

teems with top-rated eateries. Expect

the Upper West Side to become

one big burger line when his Shake

Shack opens on Columbus Avenue.

25 DOLLY LENZ

Vice Chairman of

Prudential

Douglas Elliman

This broker,

n i c k n a m e d

“Jaws” by Dennis

Kozlowski, says

she has made

$74 8, 3 1 9,0 0 0

in a single year,

which would be

four times higher

than the second-

biggest broker in America.

She’s the killer whose ambition

and contact list helped push Manhattan

into its—waning?—era of

eight-digit opulence.

26 ROBERT DE NIRO

Co-founder of Tribeca

Enterprises

Call it a Raging

Bull Market

downtown, with

Travis Bickle in

the driver’s seat,

as the famous actor

is planning another

hotel to add

to his burgeoning

empire, which

also includes Tribeca Film Center,

Tribeca Cinemas, Tribeca Grill, Nobu

and the new Greenwich Hotel.

27 HOWARD

RUBENSTEIN

Founder and President

of Rubenstein Associates

In the early ’60s,

fresh from Brooklyn,

he brought a

Manhattan real

estate millionaire

to an orphanage

to sing, beginning

a life of New York

PR that’s scarily

omnipresent (for

example, he has done work for this

newspaper). Now he spins for the

real estate billionaires, not the millionaires.

28 LEONARD LITWIN

President of

Glenwood

Management Corporation

One of the few self-made billionaires

on this list, Mr. Litwin, now in his

90s, built, literally, one of the city’s

biggest apartment portfolios. It now

includes the 45-story Liberty Plaza

in Lower Manhattan and the Pavilion

on the Upper East Side, which, when

it went up in the 1960s, was the city’s

biggest apartment tower.

29 ROBERT

LIMANDRI

Acting Commissioner

of the Department of Buildings

Mr. LiMandri took over in April from

the embattled Patricia Lancaster,

and has found himself on the proverbial

hot seat amid concerns over a

spike in construction worker deaths

and general construction safety, following

a March crane collapse in

Turtle Bay, which killed seven.

30 HOWARD LORBER

Chairman of Prudential

Douglas Elliman

Mr. Lorber, fond

of lunches at

Cipriani’s, heads

the largest residential

brokerage

in the New York

area, Prudential

Douglas Elliman.

31 STEVEN SPINOLA

President of the Real Estate

Board of New York

Mr. Spinola

heads the daily

operations of the

industry’s (and

the city’s) largest

trade group. As

REBNY’s head for

the past 20 years,

he’s become one

of real estate’s biggest lobbyists in

the corridors of government power.

32 GARY BARNETT

President of Extell

Development

This decade, Mr.

Barnett’s firm

has made quite

the development

splash, particularly

with its Ariel

East and West

condos along

Broadway in Morningside Heights.

33 BILL RUDIN

President of Rudin

Management

Scion of one of the

largest developers

and landlords

in New York’s history,

Mr. Rudin is

also one of the industry’s

biggest

philanthropists:

He is chairman of

the Association

for a Better New York.

34 BEN BERNANKE

Chairman of the

Federal Reserve

In an age where Jay-Z flashes euros in

LOCATION THE 100 OBSERVER.COM/REALESTATE LOCATION THE 100 OBSERVER.COM/REALESTATE

MTV music videos,

Mr. Bernanke,

who controls

the purse strings

of banks, matters.

Amid the subprime

mortgage

collapse that critics

complain Mr.

Bernanke should

have foreseen, he lowered the federal

funds rate and engineered the JPMorgan

bailout of Bear Stearns.

35 DARCY STACOM

Vice Chairwoman at

CB Richard Ellis

Ms. Stacom, who in 2002 left archrival

Cushman & Wakefield, where her

father and sister worked, has forged

a reputation as one of the city’s top

investment-sales brokers. Her biggest

prize: negotiating for landlord

MetLife, along with colleague Bill

Shanahan, the largest real estate

deal in modern history, the $5.4 billion

sale of Stuyvesant Town and

Cooper Village.

36 STEPHEN SIEGEL

Chairman of Global

Brokerage at CB

Richard Ellis

Mr. Siegel runs

the worldwide

operations of the

New York-based

commercial brokerage.

But, locally,

he knows just

about every deal

and dealmaker in

greater Gotham.

37 PAM LIEBMAN

CEO and President of

the Corcoran Group

Ms. Liebman

runs one of the

two largest residential

brokerages

in the New

York area, taking

the reins from

founder Barbara

Corcoran earlier this decade. Corcoran

routinely produces some of the

city’s top-grossing brokers.

38 DONALD TRUMP

CEO and President of

the Trump Organization

Even if he tends

to sell his name

to buildings instead

of actually

owning them

outright, his

stamp on the

cityscape can’t

be denied. You

behold his mark

every day in the brashness of real

estate marketing, the ubiquity of

chintz, or the gigantism of trophy

condos.

39 BILLY MACKLOWE

President of Macklowe

Properties

Mr. Macklowe must now pinch-hit

for his father, Harry, owner—for

now—of the GM Building and several

other Manhattan skyscrapers.

The family firm faces billions in

debt, its eventual success or failure

under Macklowe fils the barometer

for where the entire commercial

market’s headed.

40 SHAUN DONOVAN

Commissioner of the

Department of Housing

Preservation and Development

Mr. Donovan,

as head of the

nation’s largest

municipal

housing agency,

is charged with

implementing

Mayor Bloomberg’s

$7.5 billion

initiative to

build 165,000 a”ordable units for

500,000 New Yorkers in a 10-year

period. He’s also implementing the

much-ballyhooed 421-a reforms,

which start this summer.

41 TINO HERNANDEZ

Chairman of the

New York City Housing

Authority

Mr. Hernandez

manages the Jacob

Riis Houses

on the Lower

East Side, where

he lived in his

youth, in addition

to the 342

other public

housing developments

citywide. That’s 180,000

apartments housing more than

400,000 New Yorkers.

42 KENT SWIG

President of Swig

Equities

Harry Macklowe’s

son-in-law

oversees $3 billion

in properties,

with interests in

virtually every

sector of the industry:

developing,

brokering,

managing, you

name it. Now he’s building a hotel in

the Financial District. Maybe others:

“Downtown has the highest touristtra

!c outside of Times Square … it’s

only going to get a lot more.”

43 JAMES COOPER

Rector of the Parish of

Trinity Church

Trinity Church,

through royal

decree in 1705,

has come to own

most of Hudson

Square—six million

square feet

of commercial

space in 18 buildings.

The buildings

have over the past couple of

years drawn a heady roster: Newsweek,

New York, The New York Review

of Books, WNYC, Viacom, CBS

Radio.

44 ROBERT B.

TIERNEY

Chairman of the Landmarks

Preservation Commission

If he decides a

building here is

worth keeping, an

owner’s chance to

demolish and rebuild

is wrecked.

Tom Wolfe has

written that Mr.

Tierney lacks the

power or pluck

to stand up to developers, but this

January the commissioner told Aby

Rosen to “rethink” his Madison Avenue

tower plans.

45 IAN SCHRAGER

Chairman and CEO of Ian

Schrager Companies

The former Studio

54 impresario

revolutionized

the hotel

industry with

his stylish Morgans

Hotel in

1984, setting a

new standard

for design that

continues to influence developers

nationwide. Now, even Marriott is

joining the “boutique” bandwagon,

partnering with Mr. Schrager on a

new hip hotel chain.

46 ELLIOT ‘LEE’

SANDER

CEO and Executive Director,

Metropolitan

Transportation Authority

Mr. Sander has

extraordinar y

ambitions for

the M.T.A. that

would ease commutes

and boost

access: the Second

Avenue Subway,

an LIRR terminal

by Grand

Central and the completion of the

Fulton Street Transit Center, to

name a few. His challenge: finding

the billions needed to do it when

money is in short supply.

47 HALL WILLKIE

President of Brown

Harris Stevens

The Kentucky-born Mr. Willkie

heads one of the city’s premiere luxury

residential brokerages, with 350

brokers doing somewhere in the

neighborhood of $3 billion worth of

home sales a year.

48 DOTTIE HERMAN

CEO of Prudential

Douglas Elliman

She stormed in

from Long Island

in 2003, along

with partner

Howard Lorber,

to take control of

Douglas Elliman,

one of the city’s

most venerated

residential brokerages.

Since then, Ms. Herman

has grown it exponentially, to over

3,300 brokers, working from the

East End to the West Side.

49 BARRY GOSIN

CEO of Newmark

Knight Frank

Michael Bloomberg’s former tenant

rep is now leading a massive search

for new digs for legal giant Paul,

Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison

LLP.

50 DAVID JACKSON

CEO of Istithmar

Mr. Jackson, head of the Dubaibased

Istithmar, has snapped up

Barneys and Loehmann’s in his effort

to capitalize on New York City’s

growing income stratification. It’s

cynical. And brilliant. Istithmar and

Istithmar Real Estate have spent

no less than $7 billion in New York

since ’05.

51 FRANK GEHRY

Owner of Gehry

Partners LLP

If Bruce Ratner

is right, and his

16-skyscraperand-

arena Atlantic

Yards project

comes to fruition,

Mr. Gehry, its designer,

will alter

Brooklyn’s aesthetic

as we know

  1. If, however, it continues to stumble

… Well, just ask the Municipal Arts Society,

which recently put out some ugly

renderings to that e”ect.

52 ALBERT BEHLER

CEO of the

Paramount Group

Backed with German financing, Mr.

Behler’s Paramount Group was one

of the most active traders of buildings

last year, even after the credit

crunch. He bought 31 West 52nd

Street, sold 1177 Avenue of the

Americas and One Financial Square,

and was said to be close to buying

650 Madison Avenue.

53 JOSEPH MOINIAN

CEO of the

Moinian Group

The Persian tycoon

claims to

have developed

more property

downtown than

any other private

landowner—at

least until the

Freedom Tower

is finished—and is busy with the area’s

first major hotel project: the 57-

story W Downtown Hotel & Residences,

opening in 2009.

54 CHARLES SCHUMER

U.S. Senator

The Senate’s

third-highestranking

Democrat,

Mr. Schumer

plays an

integral role in

bringing funding

for key initiatives,

as he did

so successfully

for Lower Manhattan. And just this

week, he charted a course for West

Side land-use policy, one that would

be at odds with the city’s strategy.

55 ROBERT J.

IVANHOE

Chairman of the New

York O!ce at GreenbergTraurig

There isn’t a secret coterie of cackling

lawyers controlling New York, which

would be cool, but at least there are

huge figures like Mr. Ivanhoe, who

helped usher in the $5.4 billion Stuy

Town deal, the $675 million Plaza

purchase, and apparently the largest

U.S. residential construction loan

ever, for Larry Silverstein.

56 LARRY

SILVERSTEIN

President and CEO of

Silverstein Properties

Just two months before Sept. 11, Mr.

Silverstein signed a 99-year lease

for the World Trade Center. Bad

timing. Yet since

2001, he’s completed

7 World

Trade Center, begun

construction

of the Freedom

Tower and has

even bid on at

least one of Harry

Macklowe’s

old Equity properties.

57 ADRIAN BENEPE

Commissioner of the

Department of Parks &

Recreation

More than oneseventh

of the city

is controlled by

the agency that

Mr. Benepe has led

since the start of

the Bloomberg administration.

He is

overseeing a major

parks expansion,

and new projects like Manhattan’s

High Line are spawning nearby development

and hiking land values.

58 CHARLES P.

STEVENSON JR.

Co-op President at

740 Park Avenue

The bronze doors

to 740 Park are

worth 10 bronzed

trophy wives,

and he’s the gatekeeper.

His predecessor,

Donald

Rynne, told him

to keep the co-op

Christian, which

didn’t happen, but, like its neighbors,

740 Park is still massively white. If that

changed, its peers just might follow

suit, too.

59 MICHAEL

FASCITELLI

President of Vornado

Realty Trust

The top deputy to Steve Roth, Mr.

Fascitelli has run Vornado for more

than 10 years now and helped expand

its presence dramatically

within the city limits. It’s now one

of the biggest landlords in the Penn

Station area and a co-developer,

along with Stephen Ross’ Related,

of Moynihan Station.

60 FRANK BRUNI

New York Times

Food Critic

Tho ugh more

feared than any

other reviewer,

Mr. Bruni is not

the restaurant

grim reaper: “It’s

not my goal … to

put a restaurant out of business.” But

it happens. Just ask Alain Ducasse. Or

Tim Love. Or their landlords.

61 AVI SCHICK

Acting President and

CEO of the Empire State

Development Corporation

Supporters like Shelly Silver call

him competent, hardworking and

e”ective. Critics call him a steamroller.

Either way, he’s overseeing

billions of dollars of economic

development projects, including

Moynihan Station, Atlantic Yards,

the West Side rail yards, the Javits

Center, and ground zero.

62 ANDRÉ BALAZS

CEO of André Balazs

Properties

The handsome

hotelier behind

the Mercer and

Chateau Marmont

is developing

what some

consider the

most unusual and

significant New

York building in

years: the High Line-straddling Standard

New York, a 300-room hotel on

stilts that Curbed likened to the fourlegged

war machines from The Empire

Strikes Back.

63 MARC JACOBS

Co-founder and

Designer at

Marc Jacobs International

Marc Jacobs

didn’t invent

the West Village,

but his five

stores there have

made it into a

precious, pricey,

overpopulated,

well-corduroyed,

bubble-skirted

dreamland. There’s a store for men,

one for women, two for accessories

and one for noun-named children.

64 RICHARD LEFRAK

Chairman of LeFrak

Organization

Third-generation king of one of

New York’s most durable real estate

dynasties, Mr. LeFrak’s firm owns

more than 5,000 apartments locally

(most in LeFrak City in Queens) and

millions more square feet of o!ce

space nationwide.

65 CHRISTOPHER

WARD

Nominee for Executive

Director, Port Authority of New

York and New Jersey

Governor Paterson’s new pick to

head the bistate empire of an agency

that is the Port Authority, Mr. Ward

will oversee well over $10 billion

in new construction, including the

overbudget tangle at ground zero.

66 LLOYD GOLDMAN

President of BLDG

Management

His late uncle, Sol Goldman, was the

city’s largest private landlord by

the mid-1980s. Nephew Lloyd has

kept the family dynasty going the

past 20-odd years with his landlord

and building-management firm,

which owns hundreds of buildings

throughout the city.

67 BRUCE MOSLER

President and CEO of

Cushman & Wakefield

Mr. Mosler

heads a commercial

brokerage

that annually

competes

with archrival

CB Richard Ellis

for the distinction

of brokering

the most deals in

the city. Its biggest triumph so far?

Brokering the largest building sale

in U.S. history, $1.8 billion for 666

Fifth Avenue, in late 2006.

68 JONATHAN

MECHANIC

Chairman of

Real Estate Department at law firm

Fried Frank

The Fried Frank holiday party every

winter always draws a who’s

who of New York real estate. And a

tremendous reason for that is the

aptly named Mr. Mechanic, who

helps engineer deals for major clients,

including the embattled Harry

Macklowe.

69 ROB SPEYER

President of Tishman

Speyer

As president of

the mega-developer

and landlord

(Chrysler Building,

Stuyvesant

Town, Rockefeller

Center, etc.), Mr.

Speyer runs the

daily business of

the firm chaired

by dad Jerry.

70 ED OTT

Executive Director of

the New York City Central

Labor Council

Mr. Ott has thrown the Central Labor

Council’s hat into two of the

city’s largest residential real estate

LOCATION THE 100 OBSERVER.COM/REALESTATE LOCATION THE 100 OBSERVER.COM/REALESTATE

deals in recent

years: Stuyvesant

Town and

the attempted

purchase of Starrett

City. Now

he faces o” with

the Bloomberg

administration

over Willets Point in an attempt to

wrest concessions.

71 PETER RIGUARDI

President of Jones Lang

LaSalle’s New York o!ce

Upon his arrival

at its helm in

2002, Mr. Riguardi

began a

revamp of the

Jones Lang La-

Salle New York

o!ce. It now

does formidable

battle with

heavyweights Cushman & Wakefield

and CB Richard Ellis.

72 SCOTT LATHAM

Senior Director at

Cushman & Wakefield

A struggling artist

turned nationally

renowned commercial

real estate

broker—not

many can claim

the biography of

Cushman’s Scott

Latham. He and

his team, often

dubbed “the Fantastic Four,” routinely

broker the city’s top deals, including its

biggest-ever building sale, the $1.8 billion

trade of 666 Fifth Avenue.

73 VERONICA

HACKETT

Managing Partner of

the Clarett Group

Ms. Hackett

stands as a female

developer in

a New York universe

inhabited

by alpha males.

Her firm has developed

condos

like Sky House

and 200 West End

Avenue as well as o!ce buildings like

the 24-story 180 Madison Avenue.

74 ROBERT

FUTTERMAN

Chairman and CEO of

Robert K. Futterman & Associates

Adidas, the Gap,

Old Navy, Polo

Ralph Lauren,

H&M, Barnes &

Noble, J. Crew,

Bed Bath & Beyond—

just a few of the clients that

retail brokerage founder Mr. Futterman

claims.

75 BILL GOSS

Real Estate Editor of

The New York Times

The real estate coverage, which

Mr. Goss has been in charge of

since 2006, commands a lot of attention

from voyeurs, consumers

and—perhaps most importantly—

advertisers. And The Times’ expanded

regional and national reporting

has not gone unnoticed by

its local competitors.

76 DENNIS DE

QUATRO

Deputy Inspector,

Ninth Precinct

Since closing

down Chelsea’s

embattled

Sessa nightclub

in 2004,

the city’s top

quality-of-life

cop has turned

his attention

to “nuisance”

properties in the boozy East Village—

shuttering a fake-ID mill and

a video store-cum-brothel, among

other places—proving that rent

inflation isn’t the only vehicle of

downtown gentrification.

77 NORMAN ODER

Journalist/Blogger,

Atlantic Yards Report

The Park Slopebased

Norman

Oder runs a oneman,

one-topic

journalistic operation

that brings

a constant stream

of mostly critical

articles on Atlantic

Yards. His

presence appears to have propelled

attention and criticism of the project

now 17 months since approval.

78 DAVID CHILDS

Consulting Partner,

Skidmore, Owings &

Merrill LLP

Mr. Childs designed

the Freedom

Tower, Sheldon

Solow’s city

on the East River,

and the Moynihan

Station plan.

His vision for

modernist architecture

will,

within the coming decades, define

the aesthetic of our landscape.

79 JAMES ABADIE

Principal in Charge,

New York, Bovis Lend

Lease Holdings

He’s in charge of the general contracting

firm that New York Construction

News this year ranked the

highest-grossing in the tristate area,

with revenue of $2,671,900,000. In

that role, Mr. Abadie oversees several

projects—including such headaches

as the Deutsche Bank building

demolition and Trump Soho.

80 RICHARD LIPSKY

Lobbyist, Richard

Lipsky Associates

To many large

developers, particularly

those

who build bigbox

retail, Mr.

Lipsky is a pain

in the ass. He organizes

public

opposition and

pitches to the

media a constant David vs. Goliath

story line, usually with small retailers,

threatened by the Vornados and

the Related Companies of the world,

playing the David role.

81 PAULA DEL NUNZIO

Managing Director at

Brown Harris Stevens

Unlike Dolly

Lenz, she doesn’t

appear in Black-

Berry ads or on

Fox News, but Ms.

Del Nunzio has

helped turn uptown

mansions

into commodities

worth more

than the G.D.P. of some nations. She

set a $40 million townhouse record

in 2006, but broke that with a stillreigning

$53 million sale.

82 THOMAS FRIEDEN

New York City Health

Commissioner

The epidemiologist

has presided

over the most

massive reactionary

crackdown

on city

restaurants in

years, shuttering

some 200

locations in six

weeks after an embarrassing video

showed rats overrunning a recently

inspected eatery.

83 JESSE MASYR

Partner, Wachtel &

Masyr LLP

A key party in some of the city’s

largest development deals, Mr. Masyr,

attorney for the Related Companies,

is currently the lead private-

sector negotiator in talks for

the future of Coney Island.

84 TOM COLICCHIO

Chef and Owner of

Craft, Craftsteak,

Craftbar and ’Wichcraft restaurants

Danny Meyer’s

former partner

at Gramercy Tavern

continues to

expand his own

culinary empire

to 15 locations,

with separate

’Wichcraft kiosks

opening soon in Herald Square

and Greeley Square.

85 NICOLAI

OUROUSSOFF

Chief Architecture

Critic for The New York Times

The great champion

of New York

starchitecture

happens to not

like the term,

which he calls a

portmanteau for

the “churlish.”

His love for namebrand

architecture is nearly ceaseless

(in March he called big-designer condos

“gorgeous tokens” of New York

vanity), and it’s also captivating.

86 MARVIN MARKUS

Chairman of the Rent

Guidelines Board

Sometimes decried

as a “stooge

for the landlords,”

the man in charge

of regulating

monthly rates for

one million apartments

citywide is

actually an equalopportunity

offender.

Turns out property owners

didn’t think much of the latest round

of rent hikes, either.

87 JONATHAN MILLER

President and CEO of

Miller Samuel

His huge market reports for Elliman

can stir up exhilaration or dread

about the state of the city, the kind

of thing that makes or breaks a bubble.

Plus, his firm did $5 billion in

Manhattan evaluations last year,

which means there’s a relatively

good chance he’s appraised you.

88 ANDREW BERMAN

Executive Director,

Greenwich Village

Society for Historic Preservation

Building anything

new in

Greenwich Village

can be an

extraordinarily

trying, if not impossible,

experience

today, in

large part due

to the well-organized

resistance of Mr. Berman.

89 RICHARD BRODSKY

Member and Chair,

Committee on Corporations,

Authorities and Commissions,

New York State Assembly

The loudest legislative

critic of

New York City’s

approach to

mega-projects,

Richard Brodsky

of Westchester

takes seriously

his role as chairman

of the committee

that oversees the state’s development

agency. He was the most

visible opponent of congestion pricing

in Albany.

90 KEITH MCNALLY

Restaurateur

From Odeon to

Pastis to Schiller’s

Liquor Bar,

the former bellhop

turned eatery

titan is often

at the forefront

of a neighborhood’s

renaissance.

Now, the

Balthazaar boss is aiming to revive

Greenwich Village’s ancient Minetta

Tavern.

91 LOCKHART STEELE

Publisher of Curbed

Network

Armed with a reported

$1.5 million

in financing,

the ubiquitous

blogger, who

changed the

way New Yorkers

gossip about

what’s going on

(and up) in their

neighborhoods, is now extending

the sewing circle to more cities.

First up: Chicago. Then, who

knows? “Curbed Tallahassee’s not

launching next month or anything

like that,” he said.

92 DAVID LEVINSON

Chairman and CEO of

L&L Holding Co.

Mr. Levinson, formerly of CB Richard

Ellis, left in 2005 to found L&L.

The firm now owns and manages a

five-million-square-foot portfolio

that includes 142 West 57th Street

and 195 Broadway in the Financial

District, to which Mr. Levinson recently

lured Omnicom Group.

93 JOSEPH SITT

Principal, Thor Equities

Having snapped

up land in Coney

Island’s

amusement district,

he’s got

the city—and its

plan to turn that

land into a modern-

day Vegas

on the Atlantic—

under his thumb.

Or maybe the city, wielding the

threat of rezoning said location into

parkland, has him under its thumb.

Either way.

94 JOE CHAN

President

of the Downtown

Brooklyn Partnership

Mr. Chan, once a chief adviser to

former Deputy Mayor Dan Doctoro

“, has been working the Brooklyn

development beat since ’06. His

mission? To transform the beleaguered

nabe into a commercial and

residential boomtown.

95 MELISSA COHN

President and Owner

of Manhattan Mortgage

Last year, Ms. Cohn brokered

$1,129,126,981 in loans, which

makes her, as usual, America’s

heftiest mortgage broker. Even in

an economy jeopardized by shaky

mortgage deals, business is crisp:

She just brokered her biggest loan

ever, a $23 million monster for a

massive Central Park condo.

96 STEVE CUOZZO

New York Post

Columnist and

Managing Editor

The Andy Rooney

of New York’s real

estate and restaurant

worlds is perhaps

the foremost

expert on how bad

food can bring

down an entire

neighborhood.

97 GIUSEPPE

CIPRIANI

President of

Cipriani USA

The svelte Harry’s

Bar scion

oversees Manhattan’s

most

preeminent restaurant

empire,

with posh eateries

and banquet

halls in every

elite neighborhood.

His Venetian armor has withstood

attacks from politicians,

unions, landlords; now, the state

wants to nix his liquor licenses. Bet

on the bulletproof bald guy.

98 SAM CHANG

President of McSam

Hotel Group

The recent credit

crunch may have

curbed his appetite

for construction,

but the city’s

most prolific hotel

developer—

“We’re probably at about 40,” he said

in December—still buys and sells

with dizzying frequency, unloading

more than $190 million in property in

February and March alone.

99 DAVID YASSKY

City Councilman from

Brooklyn

The self-appointed

progressive conscious

of the City

Council, Mr. Yassky

helped spearhead

the fight for

inclusionary zoning

along the Williamsburg

waterfront (a practice

since implemented elsewhere). The

super-wonk also pushed super hard

on increasing the exclusionary zone

for 421-a tax benefits.

100 MICHAEL

SHVO

President of Shvo

Mr. Shvo changed

the way developers

sell New York luxury.

The marketing

mind behind residential

projects like

Bryant Park Tower,

W New York-

Downtown and 20

Pine the Collection has worked with

the likes of Philippe Starck, Giorgio

Armani and Jade Jagger.